Night Sky Guide September 2014

Night sky guide September 2014, will have you finding globular clusters like a pro in no time.

Visual guide from Hubble

Monthly Sky Challenge

Monday 1 September
AL3 (van den Bergh-Hagen 261) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Sagittarius.  It has a magnitude +11.00 and requires either binoculars or a small telescope to observe.  It rises at 1750BST (1650UT) and sets at 2336BST (2236UT).

Tuesday 2 September
Messier 14 (NGC 6402) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Ophiuchus.  It has a magnitude of +7.59 and will require either binoculars or a telescope to resolve any details. Messier 14 rises at 1417BST (1317UT) and sets at 0152BST (0052UT).
First quarter Moon.

Wednesday 3 September
Messier 55 (NGC 6809) is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Sagittarius.  It has a magnitude of +6.32 so requires either binoculars or a small telescope to see any details.  Messier 55 rises at 1933BST (1833UT) and sets at 0033BST (2333UT).

Thursday 4 September
NGC 4147 is a globular cluster in the constellation of Coma Berenices. It is at magnitude +10.31 so will require large binoculars or a telescope to resolve any detail.  It rises at 0636BST (0536UT) and sets at 2220BST (2120UT).

Friday 5 September
Messier 19 (NGC 6273) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Ophiuchus. It has a magnitude of +6.79 so requires binoculars to spot any detail.  It rises at 1600BST (1500UT) and sets at 2232BST (2132UT).

Saturday 6 September
Messier 71 (NGC 6836) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Sagitta.  It has a magnitude of +8.18 so requires a binoculars or a small telescope to resolve any details.  It rises at 1408BST (1308UT) and sets at 0601BST (0501UT).

Sunday 7 September
Messier 13, the Hercules Cluster (NGC 6205) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Hercules.  It has a magnitude of +5.78 so you’ll need binoculars to find this one.  The Hercules Cluster doesn’t rise or set this month.

Monday 8 September
Messier 62 (NGC ) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Ophiuchus.  It has a magnitude of +6.44 so will require binoculars to see any real detail and is a rather irregular shape.  It rises at 1626BST (1526UT) and sets at 2140BST (2040UT).

Tuesday 9 September
Messier 75 (NGC 6864) is a globular cluster in Sagittarius with a magnitude of +8.52.  Binoculars or a small telescope should enable you to see the details of its shape.  It rises at 1812BST (1712UT) and sets at 0159BST (0059UT).
Full Moon.

Wednesday 10 September
The Intergalactic Wonderer (NGC 2419) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Lynx.  It is at magnitude +10.40 so will need either large binoculars or a telescope.  It does not rise or set this month.

Thursday 11 September
Messier 22 (NGC 6656) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Sagittarius.  It is at magnitude +5.09 so will require binoculars.  It rises at 1650BST (1550UT) and sets at 0006BST (2306UT).

Friday 12 September
Messier 56 (NGC 6779) is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Lyra.  At magnitude +8.27 you’ll need binoculars or a small telescope to observe it.  Messier 56 rises at 1125BST (1025UT) and sets at 0642BST (0542UT).

Saturday 13 September
Messier 2 (NGC 7089) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Aquarius.  With a magnitude of +6.46 this requires binoculars.  It rises at 1716BST (1616UT) and sets at 0517BST (0417UT).

Sunday 14 September
Messier 69 (NGC 6637) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Sagittarius. It has a magnitude of +7.63 so binoculars are required to observe it.  It rises at 1800BST (1700UT) and sets at 2219BST (2119UT).

Monday 15 September
Messier 12 (NGC 6218) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Ophiuchs.  At magnitude +6.69 binoculars will be needed to spot this object.  Messier 12 rises at 1409BST (1309UT) and sets at 2134BST (2034UT).

Tuesday 16 September
Messier 80 (NGC 6093) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Scorpius.  At magnitude +7.32 binoculars will be needed to spot this object.  Messier 80 rises at BST (UT) and sets at BST (UT).
Last quarter Moon.

Wednesday 17 September
Messier 3 (NGC 5273) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Canes Venatici.  At magnitude +6.19 binoculars are needed to see any detail.  It rises at 0558BST (0458UT) and sets at 0031BST (2331UT).

Thursday 18 September
Messier 28 (NGC 6626) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Sagittarius.  It has a magnitude of +6.78 so you will need a telescope to view it.  Messier 28 rises at 1623BST (1523UT) and sets at 2319BST (2219UT).

Friday 19 September
Messier 72 (NGC 6981)  is a globular cluster in the constellation of Aquarius.  At magnitude +9.27 binoculars or a telescope will be required.  It rises at 1718BST (1618UT) and sets at 0308BST (0208UT).

Saturday 20 September
Messier 9 (NGC 6333) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Ophiuchus.  At magnitude +7.71 it requires binoculars to view.  Messier rises at 1539BST (1439UT) and sets at 2053BST (1953UT).

Sunday 21 September
Messier 15 (MGC 7078) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Pegasus.  At magnitude +6.19 it’s a binocular object.  Messier 15 rises at 1528BST (1428UT) and sets at 0555BST (0455UT).

Monday 22 September
Messier 62 (NGC 6266) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Ophiuchus.  With a magnitude of+6.44 it requires binoculars to view details.  It rises at BST (UT) and sets at BST UT).

Tuesday 23 September
Messier 4 (NGC 6124) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Scorpius.  With a magnitude of+5.63 it requires binoculars to view details.  It rises at 1417BST (1317UT) and sets at 2043BST (1943UT).

Wednesday 24 September
Messier 53 (NGC 5024) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Coma Berenices with a magnitude of +7.61.  It rises.
New Moon.

Thursday 25 September
Messier 70 (NGC 6681) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Sagittarius with a magnitude of +7.86.  It rises at BST (UT) and sets at BST (UT).

Friday 26 September
Messier 10 (NGC 6254) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Ophiuchus with a magnitude of +6.59.  It rises at BST (UT) and sets at BST (UT).

Saturday 27 September
Messier 54 (NGC 615) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Sagittarius with a magnitude of +7.59. Abell 1 doesn’t rise or set this month.

Sunday 28 September
Messier 92 (NGC 6341) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Hercules with a magnitude of +6.44. Messier 92 rises at.

Monday 29 September
Messier 73 (NGC 6994) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Aquarius with a magnitude of +8.89. Messier 73 rises at.

Tuesday 30 September
Messier 5 (NGC 5904) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Serpens with a magnitude of +5.65.  Messier 5 rises at.

Wednesday 31 September
Abell 2 is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Cassiopeia with a magnitude of +14.50.  Abell 2 doesn’t rise or set this month.

September 2014 planets – Where to find them

September 2014 planets – How to find them, along with some interesting dwarf planets and asteroids.

Visual guide from Hubble

Planets

Mercury imaged by Mariner 10 Mercury – Spends the entire month in the constellation of Virgo.  At the beginning of September the planet is at a magnitude of -0.2. It rises at 0818BST (0718UT) and sets at 1425BST (1325UT). By the end of the month Mercury is at a magnitude of +0.4. It will rise around 0950BST (0850UT) and set at 1903BST (1803UT).
Venus Cloud TopsSource: Hubblesite.org Venus – Is found in the constellation of Leo at the beginning of September with a magnitude of -3.9. It rises at 0452BST (0352UT) and sets at 1944BST (1844UT). By the end of the month Venus has moved into the constellation of Virgo remains at a magnitude of -3.9. It rises at 0630BST (0530UT) and sets at 1849BST (1749UT).
Mars Dust Storm Brews in Hellas Basin and Northern Polar CapSource: Hubblesite.org Mars – Is in the constellation of Libra, at the beginning of September.  It is at magnitude +0.6, rising at 1337BST (1237UT) and setting at 2154BST (2054UT). By the end of the month Mars is at magnitude +0.8 and has moved into the constellation of Ophiuchius.  It rises at 1335BST (1235UT) and sets at 2051BST (1951UT).
JupiterSource: Hubblesite.org Jupiter – Spends all of September in the constellation of Cancer.  It starts the month at magnitude -1.8, rises at 0331BST (0231UT) and sets at 1911BST (1811UT). By the end of the September it’s at magnitude -1.9, rising at 0210BST (0110UT) and setting at 1729BST (1629UT).
Saturn -- October 1997Source: Hubblesite.org Saturn – Is in the constellation of Libra all month at a magnitude of +0.6. At the beginning of September Saturn rises at 1257BST (1157UT) and setting at 2210BST (2110UT). By the end of the month it is rising at 1117BST (1017UT) and setting at 2021BST (1921UT).
Uranus 2003Source: Hubblesite.org Uranus – Spends the month in the constellation of Pisces at magnitude +5.7. At the beginning of September, Uranus rises at 2053BST (1953UT) and sets at 1004BST (0904UT). By the end of the month the planet rises at 1857BST (1757UT) and sets at 0804BST (0704UT).
Neptune - Natural Colour with SatellitesSource: Hubblesite.org Neptune – Is in the constellation of Aquarius during September at a magnitude of +7.8. It rises at 1952BST (1852UT) and sets at 0612BST (0512UT). By the end of the month it rises at 1757BST (1657UT) and sets at 0413BST (0314UT).

 

Dwarf Planets

Pluto – Is in the constellation of Sagittarius all month. At the start of September it is at magnitude 14.2. It rises at 1714BST (1614UT) and sets at 0121BST (0021UT). By the end of the month Pluto rises at 1520BST (1420UT) and setting at 2320BST (2220UT).

Ceres – Spends the month in the constellation of Libra at a magnitude of +9.0.  At the beginning of the September it rises at 1154BST (1054UT) and sets at 2320BST (2220UT). By the end of September Ceres rises at 1106BST (1006UT) and sets at 2022BST (1922UT).

Pallas – Can be found in the constellation of Virgo at the beginning of September. It rises at 0830BST (0730UT) and sets at 2216BST (2116UT) with a magnitude of +9.6. By the end of the month Pallas is at magnitude +9.5, rising at 0741BST (0641UT) and setting at 2055BST (1955UT).

Juno – Is in the the constellation of Gemini with a magnitude of +9.6 at the beginning of September.  It rises at 0209BST (0109UT) and sets at 1631BST (1531UT).  By the end of the month Juno can be found in the constellation of Canis Minor still at magnitude +9.5. It rises at 0129BST (0029UT) and sets at 1513BST (1413UT).

Vesta – Is in the the constellation of Libra during September.  At the beginning of the month Vesta rises at 1222BST (1122UT) and sets at 2211BST (2111UT). At the end of September the dwarf planet is at magnitude +7.8, rising at 1150BST (1050UT) and setting at 2211BST (2111UT).

Night sky Guide August 2014

Night sky guide August 2014 will have you whizzing round the universe looking at planetary nebula.

Visual guide from Hubble

Monthly Sky Challenge

Friday 1 August
Blinked Planetary (NGC 6826) is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Cygnus.  It has a magnitude +8.89 and required either binoculars or a small telescope to observe.  It can be seen all evening this month as it doesn’t set.

Saturday 2 August
Cats Eye Nebula (NGC 6543) is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Draco.  It has a magnitude of +8.10 and will require either binoculars or a telescope to resolve any details.  As the constellation is polar in the north it’s another object that can be seen all evening.

Sunday 3 August
Dumbbell Nebula (NGC 6853, M27) is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Vulpecula.  It has a magnitude of +7.09 so requires either binoculars or a small telescope to see any details.  The Dumbbell Nebula rises at 1558BST (1458UT) and sets at 0850BST (0750UT).

Monday 4 August
The Bowtie Nebula (NGC 40) is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Cepheus. it is at magnitude +10.60 so will require large binoculars or a telescope to resolve any detail.  It’s also visible all evening due to its position in the northern night sky.
First quarter Moon.

Tuesday 5 August
NGC 6751 is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Aquila. It has a magnitude of +11.50 so requires a telescope to spot any detail.  It rises at 1751BST (1651UT) and sets at 0455BST (0355UT).

Wednesday 6 August
Phantom Streak (NGC 6741) is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Aquila.  It has a magnitude of +11.39 so requires a telescope to see it properly.  It rises at 1713BST (1613UT) and sets at 0518BST (0418UT).

Thursday 7 August
The Little Ghost Nebula (NGC 6369) is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Ophichus.  It has a magnitude of +11.50 so you’ll need a telescope to find this one.  It rises at 1804BST (1704UT) and sets at 0121BST (0021UT).

Friday 8 August
Red Spider Nebula (NGC 6537) is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Sagittarius.  It has a magnitude of +11.89 so will require a telescope to see any real detail.  It rises at 1803BST (1703UT) and sets at 0219BST (0119UT).

Saturday 9 August
NGC 7027 is a planetary nebula in Cygnus with a magnitude of +8.50.  Binoculars or a small telescope should enable you to see the details of its shape.  It doesn’t rise or set this month.

Sunday 10 August
Blue Flash Nebula (NGC 6905) is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Delphinus.  It is at magnitude +10.89 so will need either large binoculars or a telescope.  It rises at 1613BST (1513UT) and sets at 0825BST (0725UT).
Full Moon.

Monday 11 August
Crescent Nebula (NGC 6445) is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Sagittarius.  It is at magnitude +10.89 so will require either large binoculars or a telescope.  It rises at 1736BST (1636UT) and sets at 0150BST (0050UT).

Tuesday 12 August
Eskimo Nebula (NGC 2392) is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Gemini.  At magnitude +9.19 you’ll need binoculars or a telescope to observe it.  The Eskimo Nebula rises at 0309BST (0209UT) and sets at 1928BST (1828UT).

Wednesday 13 August
Butterfly Nebula (Minkowski 2-9) is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Ophichus.  With a magnitude of +14.60 this is definitely a challenge to spot with a telescope.  It rises at 1543BST (1443UT) and sets at 0200BST (0100UT).

Thursday 14 August
Ring Nebula (NGC 6720, M57) is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Lyra. It has a magnitude of +8.80 so binoculars or a small telescope are required to observe it.  It rises at 1213BST (1113UT) and sets at 0856BST 0756UT).

Friday 15 August
Footprint Nebula (Minkowski 1-92) is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Cygnus.  At magnitude +11.00 a telescope will be needed to spot this object.  The Footprint Nebula rises at 1343BST (1243UT) and sets at 0844BST (0744UT).

Saturday 16 August
Blue Snowball Nebula (NGC 7662) is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Andromeda.  At magnitude +8.30 binoculars or a small telescope are needed to see any detail.  It doesn’t rise or set this month.

Sunday 17 August
Abell 39 is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Hercules.  It has a magnitude of +12.89 so you will need a telescope to view it.  Abell 39 rises at 1046BST (0946UT) and sets at 0509BST (0409UT).
Last quarter Moon.

Monday 18 August
Jones-Emberson 1 is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Lynx.  At magnitude +12.00 a telescope will be required.  During this month Jones-Emberson 1 doesn’t rise or set.

Tuesday 19 August
IC 3568 is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Camelopardalis.  At magnitude +10.60 large binoculars or a telescope are needed.  This is another object that doesn’t rise or set at the moment.

Wednesday 20 August
Box Nebula (NGC 6309) is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Ophiuchus.  At magnitude +11.50 it is a telescope object.  The Box Nebula rises at 1540BST (1440UT) and sets at 0125BST (0025UT).

Thursday 21 August
Little Dumbbell Nebula (MGC 650, M76) is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Perseus.  At magnitude +10.10 it’s another large binocular or telescope object.  The Little Dumbbell Nebula doesn’t rise or set.

Friday 22 August
Soap Bubble Nebula (PN G75.5 +1.7) is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Cygnus.

Saturday 23 August
Necklace Nebula (NP G054.2-03.4) is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Sagitta.

Sunday 24 August
Owl Nebula (NGC 3587, M97)is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Ursa Major with a magnitude of +9.80.  It doesn’t rise or set so is visible at any time.

Monday 25 August
NGC 6886 is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Sagitta with a magnitude of +11.39.  It rises at 1506BST (1406UT) and sets at 0716BST (0616UT).
New Moon.

Tuesday 26 August
Abell 78 is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Cygnus with a magnitude of +13.39.  It rises at 1429BST (1329UT) and sets at 1029BST (0929UT).

Wednesday 27 August
Abell 1 is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Cepheus with a magnitude of +18.70. Abell 1 doesn’t rise or set this month.

Thursday 28 August
Abell 4 is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Perseus with a magnitude of +14.80.  Abel 4 doesn’t rise or set this month.

Friday 29 August
Abell 3 is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Cassiopeia with a magnitude of +16.00.  Abell 3 doesn’t rise or set this month.

Saturday 30 August
Abell 5 is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Perseus with a magnitude of +16.00.  Abell 5 doesn’t rise or set this month.

Sunday 31 August
Abell 2 is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Cassiopeia with a magnitude of +14.50.  Abell 2 doesn’t rise or set this month.

August 2014 planets – where to find them

August 2014 planets – How to find them, along with some interesting dwarf planets and asteroids.

Visual guide from Hubble

Planets

Mercury imaged by Mariner 10 Mercury – At the beginning of August, the planet can be found in the constellation of Cancer at a magnitude of -1.6. It rises at 0432BST (0332UT) and sets at 2059BST (1959UT). By the end of the month Mercury has moved into the constellation of Virgo at a magnitude of -0.2. It will rise around 0812BST (0712UT) and set at 2033BST (1933UT).
Venus Cloud TopsSource: Hubblesite.org Venus – Is found in the constellation of Gemini with a magnitude of -3.9. It rises at 0322BST (0222UT) and sets at 2006BST (1906UT). By the end of the month Venus has moved into the constellation of Leo remains at a magnitude of -3.9. It rises at 0449BST (0349UT) and sets at 1946BST (1846UT).
Mars Dust Storm Brews in Hellas Basin and Northern Polar CapSource: Hubblesite.org Mars – Is in the constellation of Virgo, at the beginning of August.  It is at magnitude +0.4, rising at 1348BST (1248UT) and setting at 2321BST (2221UT). By the end of the month Mars is at magnitude +0.6 and has moved into the constellation of Libra.  It rises at 1337BST (1237UT) and sets at 2156BST (2056UT).
JupiterSource: Hubblesite.org Jupiter – Spends all of August in the constellation of Cancer at magnitude -1.8. At the beginning of the month it rises at 0454BST (0354UT) and sets at 2057BST (1957UT). By the end of the August it’s rising at 0334BST (0234UT) and setting at 1914BST (1814UT).
Saturn -- October 1997Source: Hubblesite.org Saturn – Is in the constellation of Libra all month. At the beginning of August it is at magnitude of +0.5, rising at 1451BST (1351UT) and setting at 0014BST (2314UT). By the end of the month it is at magnitude +0.6, rising at 1301BST (1201UT) and setting at 2214BST (2114UT).
Uranus 2003Source: Hubblesite.org Uranus – Spends the month in the constellation of Pisces. At the beginning of August Uranus is at magnitude +5.8 it rises at 2256BST (2156UT) and sets at 1210BST (1110UT). By the end of the month it’s at magnitude +5.7 rises at 2057BST (1957UT) and sets at 1008BST (0908UT).
Neptune - Natural Colour with SatellitesSource: Hubblesite.org Neptune – Is in the constellation of Aquarius during August at a magnitude of +7.8. It rises at 2155BST (2055UT) and sets at 0818BST (0718UT). By the end of the month it rises at 1956BST (1856UT) and sets at 0616BST (0516UT).

 

Dwarf Planets

Pluto – Is in the constellation of Sagittarius all month. At the start of August it is at magnitude 14.1. It rises at 1917BST (1817UT) and sets at 0326BST (0226UT). By the end of the month Pluto rises at 1718BST (1618UT) and setting at 0125BST (0025UT).

Ceres – Spends the month in the constellation of Virgo.  At the beginning of the month it is at magnitude +8.8. It rises at 1253BST (1153UT) and sets at 2355BST (2255UT). By the end of August Ceres is at magnitude +9.0, rising at 1155BST (1055UT) and sets at 2204BST (2104UT).

Pallas – Can be found in the constellation of Virgo at the beginning of August with a magnitude +9.5. It rises at 0925BST (0825UT) and sets at 2345BST (2245UT). By the end of the month Pallas is at magnitude +9.6, rising at 0832BST (0732UT) and setting at 2219BST (2119UT).

Juno – Is in the the constellation of Orion with a magnitude of +9.7 at the beginning of August.  It rises at 0252BST (0153UT) and sets at 1737BST (1637UT), but is below the horizon for UK based observers.  By the end of the month Juno can be found in the constellation of Gemini still at magnitude +9.7. It rises at 0211BST (0111UT) and sets at 1633BST (1533UT).

Vesta – Is in the the constellation of Virgo at the beginning of the month with a magnitude +7.4. It rises at 1305BST (1205UT) and sets at 0002BST (2302UT). At the end of August Vesta is at magnitude +7.7, rising at 1223BST (1123UT) and setting at 2215BST (2115UT).

Night Sky Guide July 2014

Night sky guide July 2014 will have you hunting for elliptical galaxies.

Visual guide from Hubble

Monthly Sky Challenge

Tuesday 1 July
M32 (NGC 221) is an elliptical galaxy (E2) found in the constellation of Andromeda with a magnitude of +8.10. This binocular object does not rise or set this month.

Wednesday 2 July
M49 (NGC 4472) is an elliptical galaxy (E2) found in the constellation of Virgo. It has a magnitude of +8.39 and requires binoculars to observe it.  It rises at 1230BST (1130UT) and sets at 0150BST (0050UT).

Thursday 3 July
M59 (NGC 4621) is an elliptical galaxy (E5) in the constellation of Virgo. At magnitude +9.60 you’ll need binoculars or a small telescope to observe it.  It rises at 1200BST (1100UT) and sets at 0219BST (0119UT).

Friday 4 July
M60,  (NGC 4649) is an elliptical galaxy (E2) in the constellation of Virgo.  At magnitude +8.80 you’ll need binoculars or a small telescope to observe it.  M60 rises at 1158BST (1058UT) and sets at 0217BST (0117UT).

Saturday 5 July
M86,  (NGC 4406) is an elliptical galaxy (E3) in the constellation of Virgo.  At magnitude +8.89 you’ll need binoculars or a small telescope to observe.  M86 rises at 1128BST (1028UT) and sets at 0204BSt (0104BST).
First quarter Moon.

Sunday 6 July
M84 (NGC 4374) is an elliptical galaxy (E1) in the constellation of Virgo.  At magnitude +9.10 you’ll need binoculars or a small telescope to observe it.  M84 rises at1124BST (1024UT) and sets at 0158BST (0058UT).

Monday 7 July
M87 (NGC 4486) is an elliptical galaxy (E2/P) in the constellation of Virgo.  At magnitude +8.60 you’ll need binoculars or a small telescope to observe it.  M87 rises at 1128BST (1028UT) and sets at 0157BST (0057UT).

Tuesday 8 July
M105 (NGC 3379) is an elliptical galaxy (E1) in the constellation of Leo with a magnitude of +9.30.  Binoculars or a small telescope are required to observe this object.  It rises at 0941BST (0841UT) and sets at 0012BST (2312UT).

Wednesday 9 July
M110 (NGC 205) is an elliptical galaxy (E5) in the constellation of Andromeda with a magnitude of +8.10.  Binoculars or a small telescope will be needed to observe.  M110 does not rise or set.

Thursday 10 July
C17 (NGC 147) is an elliptical galaxy (E5/P) in the constellation of Cassiopeia with a magnitude of +9.50. To observe C17  you’ll need either a pair of binoculars or a small telescope, it does not rise or set.

Friday 11 July
C18 (NGC 185) is an elliptical galaxy (E3) in the constellation of Cassiopeia with a magnitude of +9.19. Binoculars or a small telescope are needed to observers C18.  It does not rise or set.

Saturday 12 July
C35 (NGC 4889) is an elliptical galaxy (E3) in the constellation of Coma Berenices with a magnitude of +11.50. This binocular/telescope object rises at 0940BST (0840UT) and sets at 0404BST (0304UT).
Full Moon.

Sunday 13 July
C52 (NGC 4697) is an elliptical galaxy (E6) in the constellation of Virgo with a magnitude of +9.19.  Binoculars or a small telescope are needed to observe C52. It rises at 1304BST (1204UT) and sets at 0010BST (2310UT).

Monday 14 July
Draco Dwarf Galaxy  (UGC 10822) is an elliptical galaxy (E) in the constellation of Draco with a magnitude of +11.76. A telescope will be needed to observe this object.  The Draco Dwarf Galaxy does not rise or set.

Tuesday 15 July
NGC 4473 is an elliptical galaxy (E5) in the constellation of Coma Berenices with a magnitude of +10.19.  This small telescope object rises at 1050BST (0950UT) and sets at 0131BST (0031UT).

Wednesday 16 July
NGC 404 is an elliptical galaxy (E-SO) in the constellation of Andromeda with a magnitude of +10.30.  This small telescope object does not rise or set.

Thursday 17 July
Sagittarius Dwarf Elliptical Galaxy is an elliptical galaxy (E-SO) in the constellation of Sagittarius with a magnitude of +4.50.  This binocular object rises at 2151BST (20518UT) and sets at 0302BST (0202UT).

Friday 18 July
IC 1101 is an elliptical galaxy (E-SO) in the constellation of Virgo with a magnitude of +13.69.  This small telescope object rises at 1403BST (1303UT) and sets at 0315BST (0215UT).

Saturday 19 July
Maffei 1 is an elliptical galaxy (E-SO) in the constellation of Cassiopeia with a magnitude of +13.47.  This small telescope object does not rise or set.
Last quarter Moon.

Sunday 20 July
NGC 5 is an elliptical galaxy (E4) in the constellation of Andromeda with a magnitude of +13.30.  This small telescope object rises at 1754BST (1654UT) and sets at 1659BST (1559UT).

Monday 21 July
IC 1011 is an elliptical galaxy  in the constellation of Virgo with a magnitude of +13.69.  This small telescope object rises at 1331BST (1231UT) and sets at 0151BST (0051UT).

Tuesday 22 July
NGC 67 is an elliptical galaxy (E3) in the constellation of Andromeda with a magnitude of +14.19.  This  telescope object rises at 1959BST (1859UT) and sets at 1507BST (1407UT).

Wednesday 23 July
NGC 3226 is an elliptical galaxy (E2) in the constellation of Leo with a magnitude of +11.39.  This small telescope object rises at 0729BST (0629UT) and sets at 2332BST (2232UT) .

Thursday 24 July
NGC 68 is an elliptical galaxy (E-SO) in the constellation of Andromeda with a magnitude of +12.89.  This telescope object rises at 1944BST (1844UT) and sets at 1459BST (1359UT).

Friday 25 July
NGC 3377 is an elliptical galaxy (E5) in the constellation of Leo with a magnitude of +10.39.  This telescope object rises at 0825BST (0725UT) and sets at 2309BST (2209UT).

Saturday 26 July
NGC 4121 is an elliptical galaxy (E6/P) in the constellation of Draco with a magnitude of +11.60.  This small telescope object does not rise or set.
New Moon.

Sunday 27 July
NGC 4261 is an elliptical galaxy (E2) in the constellation of Virgo with a magnitude of +10.39.  This binocular/small telescope object rises at 1036BST (0936UT) and sets at 2345BST (2245UT).

Monday 28 July
NGC 4121 is an elliptical galaxy (E0) in the constellation of Draco with a magnitude of +13.50.  This small telescope object does not rise or set.

Tuesday 29 July
NGC 4308 is an elliptical galaxy (E1) in the constellation of Coma Berenices with a magnitude of +13.39.  This small telescope object rises at 0731BST (0631UT) and sets at 0243BST (0143UT).

Wednesday 30 July
NGC 4627 is an elliptical galaxy (E4/P) in the constellation of Canes Venatici with a magnitude of +12.39. This  telescope object rises at 0712BST (0612UT) and sets at 0335BST (0235UT).

Thursday 31 July
NGC 4555 is an elliptical galaxy in the constellation of Coma Berenices with a magnitude of +12.39. This telescope object rises at 0816BST (0716UT) and sets at 0211BST (0111UT).

July 2014 planets – where to find them

July 2014 planets – How to find them, along with some interesting dwarf planets and asteroids.

Visual guide from Hubble

Planets

Mercury imaged by Mariner 10 Mercury – At the beginning of July, the planet can be found in the constellation of Taurus at a magnitude of +2.2. It rises at 0416BST (0316UT) and sets at 2005BST (1905UT). By the end of the month Mercury has moved into the constellation of Cancer at a magnitude of -1.5. It will rise around 0421BST (0321UT) and set at 2008BST (1908UT).
Venus Cloud TopsSource: Hubblesite.org Venus – Is found in the constellation of Taurus with a magnitude of -3.9. It rises at 0259BST (0159UT) and sets at 1914BST (1814UT). By the end of the month Venus has moved into the constellation of Gemini at a magnitude of -3.9. It rises at 0320BST (0220UT) and sets at 2006BST (1906UT).
Mars Dust Storm Brews in Hellas Basin and Northern Polar CapSource: Hubblesite.org Mars – Spends the whole month in the constellation of Virgo. At the beginning of July it is at magnitude +0.0, rising at 1420BST (1320UT) and setting at 0104BST (0004UT). By the end of the month Mars is at magnitude +0.4, rising at 1349BST (1249UT) and setting at 2324BST (2224UT).
JupiterSource: Hubblesite.org Jupiter – Starts July in the constellation of Gemini at magnitude -1.8. It rises at 0617BST (0516UT) and sets at 2240BST (2140UT). By the end of the July it’s still at magnitude -1.8, rising at 0457BST (0357UT) and setting at 2100BST (2000UT).
Saturn -- October 1997Source: Hubblesite.org Saturn – Is in the constellation of Libra all month. At the beginning of July it is at magnitude of +0.4, rising at 1653BST (1553UT) and setting at 0217BST (0117UT). By the end of the month it is at magnitude +0.5, rising at 1455BST (1355UT) and setting at 0018BST (2318UT).
Uranus 2003Source: Hubblesite.org Uranus – Spends the month in the constellation of Pisces at a magnitude of +5.8. At the beginning of July it rises at 0101BST (0001UT) and sets at 1411BST (1311UT). By the end of the month it rises at 2300BST (2200UT) and sets at 1213BST (1113UT).
Neptune - Natural Colour with SatellitesSource: Hubblesite.org Neptune – Is in the constellation of Aquarius during July. It rises at 0002BST (2302UT) and sets at 1024BST (0924UT) with a magnitude of +7.9. By the end of the month it rises at 2159BST (2059UT) and sets at 0822BST (0722UT).

 

Dwarf Planets

Pluto – Is in the constellation of Sagittarius all month at magnitude +14.1. At the start of July it rises at 2121BST (2021UT) and sets at 0531BST (0431UT). By the end of the month Pluto rises at 1921BST (1821UT) and setting at 0330BST (0230UT).

Ceres – Is in the constellation of Virgo during July. It starts the month at magnitude +8.4, rising at 1406BST (1306UT) ans sets at 0203BST (0103UT). By the end of July Ceres is at magnitude +8.7, rising at 1255BST (1155UT) and sets at 0002BST (2302UT).

Pallas – Can be found in the constellation of Leo at the beginning of July it is at magnitude +9.3, rising at 1025BST (0925UT) and sets at 0114BST (0014UT). By the end of the month Pallas is at magnitude +9.5, rising at 0926BST (0826UT) and setting at 2347BST (2247UT).

Juno – Is in the the constellation of Taurus with a magnitude of +9.7 at the beginning of July.  It rises at 0345BST (0245UT) and sets at 1825BST (1725UT).  By the end of July Juno can be found in the constellation of Orion. It rises at 0254BST (0154UT) and sets at 1738BST (1638UT).  For the month of July Juno is below the horizon for UK observers.

Vesta – Is in the the constellation of Virgo during July. At the beginning of the month it is at magnitude +7.1, rising at 1405BST (1305UT) and sets at 0201BST (0101UT). At the end of July Vesta is at magnitude +7.4, rising at 1307BST (1207UT) and setting at 0006BST (2306UT).

June 2014 Planets – where to find them

June 2014 planets – How to find them, along with some interesting dwarf planets and asteroids.

Visual guide from Hubble

Planets

Mercury imaged by Mariner 10 Mercury – At the beginning of June, the planet can be found in the constellation of Gemini at a magintude of -1.4. In the northern lattitudes it is below the horizon. By the end of the month Mercury has moved into the constellation of Taurus at a magnitude of +2.4. It will rise around 0421BST (0321UT) and set at 2008BST (1908UT).
Venus Cloud TopsSource: Hubblesite.org Venus – Is found in the constellation of Aries with a magnitude of -4.0. It rises at 0337BST (0237UT) and sets at 1748BST (1648UT). By the end of the month Venus has moved into the constellation of Taurus at a magnitude of -3.9. By the end of the month Venus is below the horizon to observers in the UK.
Mars Dust Storm Brews in Hellas Basin and Northern Polar CapSource: Hubblesite.org Mars – Spends the whole month in the constellation of Virgo. At the beginning of June it is at magnitude -0.5, rising at 1525BST (1425UT) and setting at 0255BST (0155UT). By the end of the month Mars is at magnitude -0.0, rising at 1422BST (1322UT) and setting at 0108BST (0008UT).
JupiterSource: Hubblesite.org Jupiter – Spends the whole of June in the constellation of Gemini. At the beginning of the month Jupiter is at magnitude -1.9, rising at 0441BST (0341UT) and setting at 0023BST (2323UT). By the end of the June it’s at magnitude -1.8, rising at 0620BST (0520UT) and setting at 2244BST (2144UT).
Saturn -- October 1997Source: Hubblesite.org Saturn – Is in the constellation of Libra all month. At the beginning of June it is at magnitude of +0.2, rising at 1859BST (1759UT) and setting at 0419BST (0349UT). By the end of the month it is at magnitude +0.4, rising at 1657BST (1557UT) and setting at 0221BST (0121UT).
Uranus 2003Source: Hubblesite.org Uranus – Spends the month in the constellation of of Pisces. At the beginning of June it is at magnitude +5.9, rises at 0258BST (0158UT) and sets at 1604BST (1504UT). By the end of the month it is at magnitude +5.8, rises at 0105BST (0005UT) and sets at 1415BST (1315UT). It’s below the horizon for UK observers.
Neptune - Natural Colour with SatellitesSource: Hubblesite.org Neptune – Is in the constellation of Aquarius during June at magnitude +7.9. It rises at 0200BST (0100UT) and sets at BST (1322UT) during the beginning of May. By the end of the month it rises at 0006BST (2306UT) and sets at 1027BST (0927UT). Its below the horizon for UK observers.

 

Dwarf Planets

Pluto – Is in the constellation of Sagittarius all month at magnitude +14.1. At the start of June it rises at 2322BST (2222UT) and sets at 0733BST (0633UT). By the end of the month Pluto rises at 2125BST (2025UT) and setting at 0535BST (0435UT).

Ceres – Is in the constellation of Virgo during June. It starts the month at magnitude +7.9, rising at 1539BST (1439UT) ans sets at 0414BST (0314UT). By the end of June Ceres is at magnitude +8.4, rising at 1409BST (1309UT) and sets at 0207BST (0107UT).

Pallas – Can be found in the constellation of Leo during the month. At the beginning of June it is at magnitude +8.9, rising at 1137BST (1037UT) and sets at 0230BST (0130UT). By the end of the month Pallas is at magnitude +9.3, rising at 1027BST (0927UT) and setting at 0116BST (0016UT).

Juno – Is in the the constellation of Aries with a magnitude of +9.7. At the beginning of June it rises at 0446BST (0336UT) and sets at 1900BST (1800UT). By the end of June Juno can be found in the constellation of Taurus. It rises at 0346BST (0246UT) and sets at 1827BST (1727UT).  For the month of June Juno is below the horizon for UK observers.

Vesta – Is in the the constellation of Virgo during June. At the beginning of the month it is at magnitude +6.6, rising at 1529BST (1429UT) and sets at 0408BST (0308UT). At the end of June Vesta is at magnitude +7.1, rising at 1407BST (1307UT) and setting at 0205BST (0105UT).

Night Sky Guide June 2014

Night sky guide June 2014 will have you hunting for spiral galaxies.

Visual guide from Hubble

Monthly Sky Challenge

Sunday 1 June
M51, the Whirlpool Galaxy (NGC 5914) is a spiral galaxy found in the constellation of Canes Venatici with a magnitude of +8.39. This binocular object does not rise or set this month.

Monday 2 June
M98 (NGC 4192) is a spiral galaxy found in the constellation of Coma Berenices. It has a magnitude of +10.10 and requires binoculars or a small telescope to observe it.  It rises at 1314BST (1214UT) and sets at 0413BST (0313UT).

Tuesday 3 June
M66 (NGC 3627) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Leo. At magnitude +8.89 you’ll need binoculars to observe it.  It rises at 1228BST (1128UT) and sets at 0304BST (0204UT).

Wednesday 4 June
M104, the Sombrero Galaxy (NGC 4594) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Virgo.  At magnitude +8.00 you’ll need binoculars or a small telescope to observe it.  M104 rises at 1602BST (1502UT) and sets at 0201BST (0101UT).
First quarter Moon.

Thursday 5 June
M31, the Andromeda Galaxy (NGC 224) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Andromeda.  At magnitude +3.40 you may be able to spot it with the naked eye as a slight smudge, if you have very little light pollution. Binoculars or a small telescope will also reveal more of the detail.  M31 does not rise or set this month.

Friday 6 June
M106 (NGC 4258) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Canes Venatici.  At magnitude +8.39 you’ll need binoculars to observe it.  M106 does not rise or set this month.

Saturday 7 June
M81 (NGC 3031) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Ursa Major.  At magnitude +6.90 you’ll need binoculars to observe it.  M81 doesn’t rise or set.

Sunday 8 June
NGC 4565A is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Coma Berenices with a magnitude of +13.39.  This telescope object rises at 1150BST (1050UT) and sets at 0533BST (0433UT).

Monday 9 June
M90 (NGC 4569) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Virgo with a magnitude of +9.50.  Binoculars or a small telescope will be needed to observe.  M90 rises at 1320BST (1220UT) and sets at 0358BST (0258UT).

Tuesday 10 June
M58 (NGC 4579) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Virgo with a magnitude of +9.69. To observe M58 you’ll need either a pair of binoculars or a small telescope.  M58 rises at 1325BST (1225UT) and sets at 0347BST (0247UT).

Wednesday 11 June
M108 (NGC 3556) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Ursa Major with a magnitude of +10.00. This binocular/small telescope object does not rise or set.

Thursday 12 June
M91 (NGC4548) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Coma Berenices with a magnitude of +10.19. This binocular/telescope object rises at 1258BST (1158UT) and sets at 0353BST (0253UT)

Friday 13 June
M82 (NGC 3034) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Ursa Major with a magnitude of +8.39.  This binocular/small telescope object does not rise or set.
Full Moon.

Saturday 14 June
M99, the Coma Pinwheel Galaxy (NGC 4254) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Coma Berenices with a magnitude of +9.89. This binocular/small telescope object rises at 1234BST (1134UT) and sets at 0328 (0228UT).

Sunday 15 June
M61 (NGC 4303) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Virgo with a magnitude of +9.69.  This binocular/small telescope object rises at 1331BST (1231UT) and sets at 0229BST (0129UT).

Monday 16 June
M94 (NGC 4736) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Canes Venatici with a magnitude of +8.19.  This binocular/small telescope object does not rise or set.

Tuesday 17 June
M100 (NGC 4321) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Coma Berenices with a magnitude of +9.39.  This binocular/small telescope object rises at 1218BST (1118UT) and sets at 0329BST (0229UT).

Wednesday 18 June
M83 (NGC 5236) isa spiral galaxy in the constellation of Hydra with a magnitude of +7.50. This binocular object rises at 1822BST (1722UT) and sets at 2341BST (2241UT).

Thursday 19 June
M109 (NGC 3992) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Ursa Major with a magnitude of +9.80.  This binocular/small telescope object does not rise or set.
Last quarter Moon.

Friday 20 June
M63, the Sunflower Galaxy (NGC 5055) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Canes Venatici with a magnitude of+8.60.  This binocular/small telescope object does not rise or set.

Saturday 21 June
M95 (NGC 3351) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Leo with a magnitude of +9.69.  This binocular/small telescope object rises at 1049BST (0949UT) and sets at 0109BST (0009UT).

Sunday 22 June
Caldwell 3 (NGC4236) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Draco with a magnitude of +9.60.  This binocular/small telescope object does not rise or set.

Monday 23 June
M85 (NGC 4382) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Coma Berenices with a magnitude of +9.10.  This binocular/small telescope object rises at 1141BST (1041UT) and sets at 0324BST (0224UT) .

Tuesday 24 June
M101, the Pinwheel Galaxy (NGC 5457) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Ursa Major with a magnitude of +7.90.  This binocular object does not rise or set.

Wednesday 25 June
M64, the Black Eye Galaxy (NGC 4826) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Coma Berenices with a magnitude of +8.50.  This binocular/small telescope object rises at 1139BST (1039UT) and sets at 0412BST (0312UT).

Thursday 26 June
Caldwell 5 (IC 342) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Camelopardalis with a magnitude of +8.39.  This binocular/small telescope object does not rise or set.

Friday 27 June
M88 (NGC 3368) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Coma Berenices with a magnitude of +9.60.  This binocular/small telescope object rises at 1156BST (1056UT) and sets at 0250BST (0150UT).
New Moon.

Saturday 28 June
M96 (NGC 3368) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Leo with a magnitude of +9.30.  This binocular/small telescope object rises at 1023BST (0933UT) and sets at 0045BST (2345UT).

Sunday 29 June
M102, the Spindle Galaxy (NGC 5866) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Draco with a magnitude of +9.89.  This binocular/small telescope object does not rise or set.

Monday 30 June
M65 (NGC 3623) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation of Leo with a magnitude of +9.30. This binocular/small telescope object rises at 1040BST (0940UT) and sets at 0117BST (0017UT).

Night Sky Guide May 2014

Night sky guide May 2014 includes some easy objects such as double stars and some more challenging globular clusters.

Visual guide from Hubble

Monthly Sky Challenge

Thursday 1 May
Hercules Cluster (M13, NGC 6205) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Hercules with a magnitude of +5.78. This binocular object does not rise or set this month.

Friday 2 May
Cor Caroli (Alpha1 Canum Venaticorum) is a double star in the constellation of Canes Venatici. It has magnitudes of +5.48 and +2.77 and it does not rise or set this month.

Satday 3 May
Intergalatic Wanderer (C25, NGC 2419) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Lynx with a magnitude +10.40. It does not rise or set.

Sunday 4 May
Almach (Gamma1 Andromeda) is a double star in the constellation of Andromeda with magnitudes of +2.17 and +4.75. Almach doesn’t rise or set.

Monday 5 May
Messier 3 (NGC 5272) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Canes Venatici with a magnitude of +6.19. This binocular object rises at 1445BST (1345UT) and sets at 0918BST (0818UT).

Tuesday 6 May
Procyon (Alpha Canis Minoris) is a double star in the constellation of Canis Minor with magnitudes of +0.40 and +10.80. Procyon rises at 1122BST (1022UT) and sets at 0029BST (1129UT).

Wednesday 7 May
Messier 10 (NGC 624) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Ophiuchus with a magnitude of +6.59. This binocular object rises at 2126BST (2021UT) and sets at 0851BST (0751UT).

The first quarter Moon.

Thursday 8 May
Algorab (Delta Corvi) is a double star in the constellation of Corvus with magnitudes of +2.97 and +8.49. Algorab rises at 1808BST (1708UT) and sets at 0347BST (0247UT).

Friday 9 May
Messier 53 (NGC 5024) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Coma Berenices with a magnitude of +7.61. This binocular object rises at 1525BST (1425UT) and sets at 0708BST (0608UT).

Saturday 10 May
Castor (Alhpa Geminorum) is a double star in the constellation of Gemini with magnitudes of +1.58 and +2.48. Castor rises at 0734BST (0634UT) and sets at 0337BST (0237UT).

Sunday 11 May
Messier 5 (NGC 5904) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Serpens with a magnitude of +5.65. This binocular object rises at 1858BST (1758UT) and sets at 0730BST (0630UT).

Monday 12 May
Regulus (Alpha leonis) is a double star in the constellation of Leo with magnitudes of +1.40 and +8.18. Regulus rises at 1249BST (1149UT) and sets at 0313BST (0213UT).

Tuesday 13 May
Messier 12 (NGC 6218) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Ophiuchus with a magnitude of +6.69. This binocular object rises at 2041BST (2041UT) and sets at 0829BST (0729UT).

Wednesday 14 May
Mizar (Zeta Ursae Majoris) is a double star in the constellation of Ursa Major with magnitudes of +3.85 and +2.18. Mizar does not rise or set.
Full Moon.

Thursday 15 May
Messier 56 (NGC 6779) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Lyra with a magnitude of +8.27. To view Messier 56 binoculars or a small telescope are required. It rises at 1917BST (1817UT) and sets at 1434BST (1334UT).

Friday 16 May
Arrakis (Mu Draconis) is a double star in the constellation of Draco with magnitudes of +5.63 and +5.63. Arrakis does not rise or set.

Saturday 17 May
NGC 5053 is a globular cluster in the constellation of Coma Berenices with a magnitude of +9.47. Binoculars or a small telescope are needed to view this cluster which rises at 1501BST (1401UT) and sets at 0637BST 0537UT).

Sunday 18 May
Rasalgethi (Alpha2 Herculis) is a double star in the constellation of Hercules with magnitudes of +5.32 and +3.43. Rasalgethi rises at 1915BST (1815UT) and sets at 1009BST (0909UT).

Monday 19 May
Messier 92 (NGC 6341) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Hercules with a magnitude of +6.44. This binocular object does not rise or set.

Tuesday 20 May
Polaris (Alpha Ursae Minoris) is a double star in the constellation of Ursa Minor with magnitudes of +2.00 and +9.00. Polaris does not rise or set.

Wednesday 21 May
Caldwell 66 (NGC 5694) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Hydra with a magnitude of +10.17. Large binoculars (20 x 80) or a small telescope will allow observation. Caldwell 66 rises at 2041BST (1941UT) and sets at 0311BST (0211UT).

Last quarter Moon.

Thursday 22 May
Albireo (Beta1 Cygni) is a double star in the constellation of Cygnus with a magnitude of +3.07. Albireo rises at 1929BST (1829UT) and sets at 1355BST (1255UT).

Friday 23 May
NGC 6229 is a globular cluster in the constellation of Hercules with a magnitude of +9.39. Large binoculars (20×80) or a small telescope are needed to observe the cluster which does not rise or set.

Saturday 24 May
Porrima (Gamma Virginus) is a double star in the constellation of Virgo with magnitudes of +3.50 and +3.40. Porrima rises at 1550BST (1450UT) and sets at 0343BST (0243UT).

Sunday 25 May
Messier 68 (NGC 4590) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Hydra with a magnitude of +7.81. Binoculars are needed to observe the cluster with rises at 1828BST (1728UT) and sets at 0053BST (1153UT).

Monday 26 May
Sheliak (Beta Lyrae) is a double star in the constellation of Lyra with magnitudes of +3.51 and +8.72. Sheliak rises at 1718BST (1617UT) and sets at 1414BST (1314UT).

Tuesday 27 May
IC 1276 is a globular cluster in the constellation of Serpens with a magnitude of +10.37. Large binoculars (20×80) or a small telescope are needed to view the cluster which rises at 2138BST (2038UT) and sets at 0828BST (0728UT).

Wednesday 28 May
Achird (Eta Cassiopeia) is a double star in the constellation of Cassiopeia with magnitudes of +7.51 and +3.44. Achird does not rise or set.

New Moon.

Thursday 29 May
NGC 6539 is a globular cluster in the constellation of Serpens with a magnitude of +9.32. Large binoculars (20×80) or a small telescope are needed to observe the cluster which rises atv2126BST (2026UT) and sets at 0812BST (0712UT).

Friday 30 May
Izar (Epsilon Bootis) is a double star in the constellation of Bootes with magnitudes of +4.65 and +2.26. Izar rises at 1423BST (1323UT) and sets at 0829BST (0729UT).

Saturday 31 May
Palomar 2 is a globular cluster in the constellation of Auriga with a magnitude of +13.03. A telesope is required to view this cluster which rises at 0330 BST (0230UT) and sets at 2316BST (2216UT).

May 2014 Meteor Showers

Meteor Showers and Comets

May 2014 meteor showers are listed below.

Eta Aquariids – Is a major (class 1) shower with approximately 70 meteors per hour which peaks on 6 May at 0817BST (0718UT). The parent comet is 1P/Halley (Halley’s Comet). This meteor shower is mainly a southern hemisphere shower, though it can be observed before dawn in the northern hemisphere. The outlook for the Eta Aquariids shower is expected to be quite good

Eta Lyrids – Is a minor (class 2) shower with approximately 3 meteor per hour which peaks on 8 May at 2217BST (2117UT). The parent comet for this shower is C/1983 H1 (IRAS-Araki-Alcock). The outlook for this meteor shower this year is expected to be poor. The Moon will be 8 days old (58% full) so make it a challenge to spot these faint meteors.

Comet 3D/Biela – Can be found in the constellation of Aries at the beginning of May. It rises at 0554BST (0454UT), sets at 2150BST (2050UT) and is at a magnitude of +8.8. By the end of the month the comet moves into the constellation of Taurus. It rises at 0433BST (0333UT), sets at 2114BST (2014UT) and will be at magnitude +8.8.

Comet 7P/Pons-Winnecke – Can be found in the constellation of Lynx at a magnitude of +19.5. At the beginningo of the month it does not rise or set. By the end of May it rises at 0710BST (0610UT), sets at 0422BST (0322UT) and is at magnitude +19.1.

Comet 32P/Comas Sola – Can be found in the constellation of Aries at a magnitude of +17.1 at the beginning of the month. It rises at 0558BST (0458UT) and sets at 2105BST (2005UT). At the end of May it has moved into the constellation of Taurus. It rises at 0427BST (0327UT) and sets at 2038BST (1938UT) at a magnitude of +16.5.

Comet 46P/Wirtanen – Can be found in the constellation of Virgo during May. At the beginning of the month it is at magnitude +18.2, rises at 1819BST (1719UT) and sets at 0650BST (0550UT). By the end of the month it rises at 1601BST (1501UT) and sets at 0430BST (0330UT) and is at magnitude +18.9